Friday, March 28, 2008

Akar Yunomi Invitational 2008


What is a yunomi you ask? Yunomi is an informal Japanese teabowl that is taller than wide, with a trimmed foot.

Akar's site was overwhelmed this morning, but the bottleneck seems to have opened up. I am having a lot fun meandering around the exhibition. Just click here (or on the screenshot above) if you want to see my tea bowls. Enjoy the show!

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Thursday, March 27, 2008

Yunomis and Postcards

A few updates:

In a few hours (March 28, 2008. 10am ct) the Yunomi Invitational 2008 exhibition at Akar is opening online. You'll find several of my tea bowls in their online exhibition(!). My artist statement & resume are up on Akar's site now. I can't wait to see the show tomorrow. My tea bowls are in very good company! More to come on the show...

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front

back

My friend, Gary Jackson, put together this wonderful super sized postcard for me to take to NCECA last week. If you've come upon my blog via this postcard, welcome! If you'd like to sign up for the potteryblog.com mailing list, just go here. If you sign up, you'll automatically get an email whenever there is a new post. Or of course you can always sign up for the RSS or Atom feeds. I'm looking forward to hearing from the new readers out there. I've got a lot of interesting things in the works, many of which are responses to suggestions from potteryblog.com readers. Thanks for all of the emails and comments!

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Monday, March 03, 2008

I'm getting ready for NCECA...are you?

I'm getting ready to head out to Pittsburgh in a week and a half to attend NCECA. One of my favorite parts of it is the cup sale. I love donating as many mugs as I can fit into my carry on (along with cups from friends who aren't attending). I really love spending time pouring over the hundreds of cups that are just sitting, unpretentiously, on long folding tables. Cups of all shapes & sizes from potters of all skill levels and from many corners of the world. The variety of designs and finishing techniques always amazes me. And unlike a normal gallery setting, you get to pick up almost every single piece if you want to and study them.
A little info on the cup sale from the NCECA website:
  • At the Louisville 2007 NCECA Conference, 745 cups (of every design and ceramic material imaginable) were donated to the Annual Cup Sale
  • An estimated 2000 viewers – many of them returning several times – visited the Cup Sale exhibition
  • Hundreds of eager buyers gathered throughout the morning hours on Friday to purchase their favorites
  • Within 3 hours of the Sale’s opening, a record $20,483 was raised for the NCECA Fund for Artistic Development!

And if you're not able to make it to NCECA this year, it's not to late to mail in a cup or two for the sale. You can ship your pots so they arrive by March 14th to:

Josh Green

(for NCECA Cup Sale)

Manchester Craftsmen’s Guild

1815 Metropolitan Street

Pittsburgh, PA 15233

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Is anyone else out there spending part of their mid-March in Pittsburgh? Let me know if you'd like to meet up in person. I'd love to get together with other bloggers and blog readers in person(!) Send me an email if you'd like to figure out a time to meet up for lunch, dinner, coffee or a beer (emily@sodafired.com).

And if you're not able to go to NCECA this year, I'm hoping to do some somewhat "live" blogging from the conference. I'll have my laptop, camera and an internet connection at my hotel. Check back to see what's happening!

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Thursday, December 06, 2007

A Holiday Tour of Lillstreet Studios

I thought I'd give a little tour of what some of the studios are offering this holiday season at Lillstreet Studios in Chicago. It's truly a unique shopping experience to be able to shop directly from the artists in their studios. I'm including photos of just a sampling of the studios. There are over 50 artists under one roof - and that's not including Lillstreet's Gallery!

ceramics by Emily Murphy










ceramics by Lisa Harris







pottery by Karen Avery

pottery by Gary Jackson







porcelain by Joanna Kramer
porcelain by Karen Patinkin






ceramic and glass beads by Amy Lemaire







porcelain by Deborah Schneider







agricultural art by Cathi Bouzide



Photography by Guy Nicol








pottery by Mike Szostak



jewelry by 2nd floor metals artists





Many of the studios are open daily...
check in with individual artists for their hours

Monday - Friday 12noon - 6pm
Saturdays 10am - 6pm
Sundays 12noon - 5pm

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Friday, November 30, 2007

Studio Holiday Sale

Tonight's the night! It's the opening night for the holiday show at my studio at Lillstreet Studios in Chicago.


If you're in the area, I hope you can stop by tonight, or any time over the next 3 weeks. Details and some pictures to tempt are below.




Opening Night Reception
Friday, November 30, 2007 - 6pm - 9pm
Lillstreet Studios
205 west
4401 N. Ravenswood
Chicago, IL 60640




I have a studio full of new work including the ceramic pendants that you see above that hang on a cord of hand dyed silk. You'll also see the familiar faces of mugs, serving bowls, honey pots and more.












Studio hours for the holidays:
weekdays: 12 noon - 6pm
Saturdays: 10am - 6pm
Sundays: 12 noon - 5pm


There are over 40 artists at Lillstreet Studios making functional pottery, tiles, sculpture, jewelry, photography, handmade beads and more. If I'm not at my studio, one of my studio mates can help you out. If you want to be sure to meet up with me, just send me an email (emily@sodafired.com).

You can probably find something for everyone on your list at Lillstreet Studios. I have some ridiculously functional things that everyone can use. Why shouldn't your soap dispenser be as beautiful and functional as your favorite mug?



Directions to my studio.
I accept cash, checks, Visa and Mastercard.
It's easy to get to with lots of parking for cars and bikes.
There is a ton of public transportation to help you get there. And the exciting news is that the Montrose Stop on the Brown line is open after a year of renovations!



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And on a much more personal note...
I haven't been writing to my blog much lately because I've had a very happy distraction. My sister, Nora, had a little baby boy, Shiya, on November 18, 2007 at 4:12pm. Congratulations!
I've been spending a lot of time with my sister, baby Shiya and big brother Ayrie. (The happy new family is in the picture to your left!)

Happy Holidays!

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Sunday, November 11, 2007

A Happy Soda Firing

I fired last week. When I'm done glazing, but before I load the soda kiln, I sit down and roll hundreds of wads for the bottom of my pieces. It always takes a ridiculously long amount of time. Time when I'm feeling a bit anxious about getting things done on schedule. When I was rolling my wads for this last kiln, it was a sunny day, and the morning sun was hitting them in the most beautiful way. I took this picture to share with all of you. My happy spin on a less than fun job.

Wadding Recipe
for the soda kiln (pretty standard) (by volume):
  • 1 part EPK
  • 1 part alumina hydrate
  • medium grog to taste (not really, but you know what I mean...)
I roll my wads ahead of time and put them in a plastic container (the ones from the local Thai take-out place are the best). Then I glue them to the bottoms of pots before loading (Elmer's glue). Breaking up the wadding into steps keeps my hands cleaner and helps me avoid the problem of getting wadding where it doesn't belong.

A shot of the front of the kiln. It was an interesting firing. I reduced the amount of soda that I added by about 25% or so.
(new) Soda Mixture:
  • 1.75 lbs. of soda ash
  • 2.25 lbs. of soda bicarb
  • 4 lbs. of whiting
Mixed together with 1/4 of a 5 gallon bucket of wood chips. Mix together well, then add enough water (while mixing) to the consistency of oatmeal cookie dough. I add it on an piece of angle iron through the ports on the front of the kiln when c. 9 is soft. (More on this in a future post.)

Below are some tea bowls that I got out of this firing.


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Tuesday, October 16, 2007

Empty Bowls - Chicago Style

This December, Lillstreet Art Center is hosting their 2nd annual Empty Bowls event. Last year we had a great turnout, but the plan is to really scale it up this year. Tons of bowls, a big community of people and soup galore will all come together to raise money and awareness to help fight hunger.

The request that I'm sending out is for potters, glass blowers, wood turners, and metal smiths of all levels to make a bowl (or 2 or 20) and donate it to Chicago's Empty Bowls event at Lillstreet Art Center. We'd also like for you to come a share a meal, if you're in the area on December 7, 2007 from 6pm - 9pm. For $20, guests are invited to choose a bowl and are served a generous serving of soup and bread made by First Slice Café. Guests keep the bowl as a reminder that there are always “empty bowls” in the world.

Lillstreet has a very unique restaurant in it's building (sharing space with the gallery), the First Slice Café. Proceeds from the cafe go to feed Chicago's hungry. They help fight hunger in a very direct way: the food they make for various organizations is the same amazing food that is served in their café. In addition to First Slice making the food for the event, they will also be the recipient of the event's proceeds so they can continue to create healthy meals for these local organizations: Heartland Alliance, The Night Ministry, American Indian Center Youth Program, and Howard Area Alternative High School.

If you would like to participate in this event by donating a bowl, please deliver or mail your bowl(s) by November 18, 2007 to:

Lillstreet Art Center
4401 North Ravenswood
Chicago, IL 60640
Attn: Empty Bowls

If you'd like to join us for a bowl of soup, come to Lillstreet on December 7, 2007 from 6pm - 9pm.

If you have any questions about this event, you can contact the event organizer, Joanna Kramer.
Please help us spread the word by forwarding this to a friend. Thanks!


The bowls that are in the photo above are by Gary Jackson, Fire When Ready Pottery.

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Sunday, October 14, 2007

Being to Being: Collective Conversations in Clay

This is a virtual tour of a show that I am currently in: Being to Being: Collective Conversations in Clay at Park West Ceramics Gallery in Chicago. The concept for the show is very unsual (remember, I like unconventional things...).

Here's the idea: There are 5 artists, all with different styles of making and decorating. Each artist made 5 pieces. One of the pieces is made start to finish by that original artist. The other 4 pieces are handed off in the leather hard stage to the other 4 artists. Each participant decorates the 4 pieces from the other artists. Carving and cutting, slips and glazes, adding clay pre- and post firing, atmospheric firings and decals were some of the techniques used.

The photos in this post were taken on opening night and aren't actually the best images. Sometime in the next couple of weeks I'll add better images, but I was too excited about this show to wait for those images. But for now, you can get an idea of what the show is all about...
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Platter by Emily Murphy. Soda fired with a crackle slip and sprayed glazes.

top left: Slipped wood fired with low fire decals by Gina Hutchings.
top right: Cut, carved, slipped, glazed and wood fired by Jay Strommen.
bottom left: Slipped, glazed, punctured, reduction fired, then sewn by Joanna Kramer.
bottom right: Cut, then applied stoneware "staples" and porcelain coil then soda fired by Shane Grimes.

The next series are porcelain hand built slab "landscape" vases by Joanna Kramer.
Below is her solo piece that is actually two porcelain vases that are sewn together (post firing, of course!).

top left:
Glazed and wood fired with low fire decals applied by Gina Hutchings.
top right: Slipped, glazed, cut and carved then wood fired by Jay Strommen.
bottom left: Slipped, glazed and soda fired by Emily Murphy.
bottom right: Slipped and carved with stoneware staples and porcelain coils attached and then soda fired by Shane Grimes.

Jay Strommen's pieces are thrown and altered with slips and lightly glazed then wood fired.

top left: Slipped, glazed, wood fired with decals by Gina Hutchings.
top right: Slipped, punctured, glazed and reduction fired then sewn by Joanna Kramer.
bottom left: Lots of stoneware staples and porcelain coils added, then soda fired by Shane Grimes.
bottom right: Slipped, carved, glazed and then soda fired by Emily Murphy.

The next group is from Shane Grimes. Shane's pieces are thrown and altered. His solo piece has his trademark stoneware staples and incredibly thin porcelain spines/coils attached, then soda fired.
top left: Cut, carved, slipped, glazed and wood fired by Jay Strommen.
top right: Soda fired then a decal applied by Gina Hutchings (it's a very cool spider).
bottom left: Slipped, cut, punctured, glazed and reduction fired by Joanna Kramer, then sewn.
bottom right: Slipped, glazed and soda fired by Emily Murphy.

The Geisha series is by Gina Hutchings who is also the organizer of the show.
Her piece below is glaze and wood fired with a decal applied.

top left: Stoneware staples and porcelain coils attached then soda fired by Shane Grimes.
top right: Slipped, punctured, glazed, reduction fired then sewn by Joanna Kramer.
bottom left: Slipped, carved, glazed and wood fired by Jay Strommen.
bottom right: Slipped, glazed and soda fired by Emily Murphy.

The next group of photos are some close up detail images. Because of the lighting in the gallery, it was hard to get really good photos on opening night. I hope these detail images help you fill in the gaps. (click on images to make them bigger)


































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Sunday, October 07, 2007

Unconventional Vases

I have been making these oval vases for a while in all different shapes and sizes. The idea for these pieces emerged out of a desire to make a vase that can sit in the middle of a table with flowers in it, yet it's short enough to see your sweetie sitting across the table. Vases are a form that I've battled with. I have high standards for my pieces (vases and others). They must be able to stand on their own, without fulfilling their given purpose. And when they are doing their duty, like holding flowers, it must function flawlessly. My battle with the classic vase form is that I am not interested in it as a stand alone form. I know it's a broad generalization, but it's something that I tackle over and over again, and the form just isn't "strong" enough for my taste. When I push and pull the classic vase form into something that I really like, it is more like a bottle and can't hold more than 1 flower... So I seem to end up venturing into vase forms that are unconventional.

And since I like things that are unconventional, I am doing a show this much that is just that...unconventional. Haus (a wonderful ceramics gallery in Chicago) has coordinated this show for Chicago Artist's Month (which is October). The tables at Anteprima, a fantastic Italian restaurant in Chicago's Andersonville neighborhood have been filled with my oval vases. The vases have been filled by Sunburst Flowers, another Andersonville neighborhood business. I love all the collaboration!

The above image is of one of the beautiful arrangements for the show. The below image is of some of my platters at the restaurant. When Anteprima was opening, I was commissioned to make these platters.

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Friday, September 21, 2007

8 Random Things

I was tagged with 8 random things by Pam McFadyen from Lurearts Ceramics.

The rules:

1. Let others know who tagged you.
2. Players start with 8 random facts about themselves.
3. Those who are tagged should post these rules and their 8 random facts.
4. Players should tag 8 other people and notify them they have been tagged.


Here I go with 8 random things about myself (in absolutely no particular order)...


1. I have an painted art car. The inside is decked out with fringe and all. A couple of years ago Ian and I decided to paint our car to cover up some chipping paint. The result has been lots of smiles and random conversations with strangers- something that should happen more often! The interior fringe was hunted down during a trip to Mexico. I like having a little something special inside the car- besides making me smile, it also reminds me that the outside is painted, and that's why people are looking at the car.

2. Chicago has been my home for the last 8+ years. We've lived in roughly the same area (northside- Lincoln Square/ Uptown/ Ravenswood/ Andersonville) the whole time we've been in Chicago. I run into people I know all the time when I'm out and about. It feels like a small town. You can walk just about anywhere you need to go. The same clerks work at the neighborhood grocery store since we've lived here. I go to the little neighborhood farmer's market every week. Two sites/ blogs I like about Chicago are: The Chicagoist and Gaper's Block.

3. I went to Earlham College where I majored in Art with a double focus in ceramics and metals (class of '99). It's where I met Ian and learned to make pots.

4. I am the hopelessly devoted aunt to 3 (soon to be 4) amazing nephews. Orion, Ayrie and Jonah. I am known to them as Emmy. The photo was taken by Ian last Christmas. They were inside the house and Ian was outside. We have decided that if they ever start a band together, that this will be their first album cover and they will be called the Formidable Murphy Boys.

















5. I'm a customer service pro. Friends and family use me to help them work out tough customer service problems. I don't actually enjoy the process of being on hold, but I feel extremely satisfied when I can solve a problem. I have a bit of a love-hate relationship with this particular talent of mine. I've been enjoying the blog: The Consumerist lately.

6. I LOVE my label maker. Actually, I have 2 of them. One for my studio, one for home. You can see a small glimpse of what our office at home looks like from the picture. The label maker is actually sitting on the shelf in front of the books. It actually has it's own labeled bin, but it was out since I had just used it.
I could go on about my love of the label maker, but I think I'll just stop there.



7. I grew up in Keene, NH. I have family in the area, still. I get to visit several times a year. My dad, Jim Murphy, is a painter who is inspired by the beautiful landscape.

















8. I love jewelry. Handmade beautifully designed jewelry. My favorite jeweler also happens to be a good friend: Sarah Chapman. I love her designs- they are completely original. Her craftsmanship is impeccable. And the pieces have this great ability to go from fitting perfectly with jeans and a t-shirt in the studio to dress up for a night on the town.

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Sunday, August 26, 2007

What I've been up to

I've been busily working away in my studio lately - and I thought I'd share a little. Below are some small teapots that I just fired last week. I usually make larger teapots, but the one-person teapot has won my heart over!When I'm not making pots, I've been working on my blog. In addition to writing posts this week, I've discovered Google Analytics and I've been having a lot of fun with it.

A little sampling of the information that I've gotten from it this week...

Visitors of Pottery Blog are from:
US, Canada, United Kingdom, Australia, Sweden, Israel, Mexico, Brazil, France, India, Romania, Japan, Switzerland, South Africa, Taiwan, Germany, Denmark, Philippines, Italy, Greece, Turkey, Norway, Poland, New Zealand, Russia, Czech Republic, Slovenia, Singapore, Estonia, Iran, Lithuania, Ireland, Sri Lanka, Finland, Indonesia, Netherlands, Spain, Portugal

A sampling of search phrases:
In addition to the basic phrases and keywords (soda firing, Emily Murphy, pottery blog, ceramics blog) there are some other more in depth searches like:
  • using shino in soda firing
  • ceramic kiln timings
  • ceramic wedging boards from plaster
  • site:potteryblog.com pottery blog tour part 2
  • can i have a signature stamp made of my signature?
  • how to throw a pottery mug
  • eat his heart out with a spoon (!)
And some things that I think my blog was probably not helpful with:
  • how to pronounce "pottery" in korean
  • emily murphy "neuroscience"
I have also been spending time reading other people's blogs. You can see my list of links on the right side of the page (just scroll down a little). Between reading all of these great blogs from around the world, and then seeing where my site visitors are coming from, the world is feeling very small.

I'm off now to have a completely different art experience. Ian and I are heading out to Burning Man in Nevada for the next week with a gang of folks from The Opening Planning Project and friends. Most of this will not be clay related, but some is. There is going to be a tea stand/ house at our theme camp that I made teapots and tea bowls for.
Burning Man is known for an event with virtually no commerce, and lots of "gifting." The gifts that we're bringing are necklaces (pendants) that are made out of both porcelain and stoneware, and have some of the soil (playa) from the host land rolled into the clay, and then soda fired. The soil fluxes to a temoku like glaze. Photos to come!

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Tuesday, April 24, 2007

Artist Statement, April 2007

Looking back and moving forward.

Clay is one of the oldest materials used by humans, and its place in the lives of humans has changed and evolved as we have. It's had a central place in a community as vessels that store water and grains. Today we most often see clay in the form of toilets, sinks, heater elements, and our molded dishes. With modern manufacturing we have personal spaces which we can easily fill to overflowing with things, so that few people can really say they lack any quantity of items. We store water in disposable plastic bottles, we store our food in layers of boxes and plastic bags, and once we've used these up we store the garbage in more layers of plastic until they can be taken away in the metal boxes on wheels. Things just flow through our hands, from factory to landfill, each item indisguishable from the next and inevitably forgotten once sealed in the earth.

So the place that clay has in our world today is much different than it's been before. Clay is still plentiful, but it's never been disposable. And clay as art still has the intention and purpose behind it that long ago would have been present in every vessel. It can be something to stop our busy lives for a few moments in the morning to meditate over our morning coffee out of our favorite mug. It can be a vase that with or without flowers, we can stop to think about how it is one of the few objects in our lives that are hand made and individual.

Each and every piece that I make is one of a kind. I often make pieces in a series, but because they are hand crafted and fired in a soda kiln no two pieces are identical. I'm drawn to the pieces with a depth that you can explore, with subtle nuances in the texture and patterns in the glaze. A piece where you can always look a little closer and see something new. You aren't going to see that in a mass produced plate from Target, or a ceramic mug from Ikea. Our lives are busy and we often don't allow ourselves to slow down and take a moment to reflect. I see clay/pottery/ceramics as a way to feel a connection with another person, and an excuse to slow down for a moment.

Clay is a material that has a long and rich tradition. I try to reference that history, but in the context of our contemporary world. This is why I love the process of soda firing, also a contemporary adaptation of an older process.

In the 14th century potters began using a technique called salt firing. By adding salt into a kiln, the pieces would be glazed without having to individually apply glaze to each piece. This was great for the very utilitarian pieces like sewer pipes and whiskey jugs. But by the 1970's there were problems with the technique – black smoke comes from the chimneys, and it wasn't very friendly to the environment or your neighbors. So another technique was developed, using soda ash and baking soda. The kiln is gas fired and this soda mixture is added to the kiln near the end of the firing (around 2200°F); the soda vaporizes and is carried on the flame throughout the kiln. The soda reacts with the pieces, changing their color and texture. The variations you see on the pieces come from the variations in the kiln – how close a piece is to the burner, how much room there is for the flame to flow across the piece, even the temperature outside or the humidity can effect the outcome. Even after firing soda kilns hundreds of times there are still surprises to be found in how the pieces react. The pieces that I have created for this exhibition are tributes to the unpredictable and unique effects of this process.

Emily Murphy

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Sunday, April 22, 2007

New Soda Fired Work by Emily Murphy

Here is a virtual tour of the exhibition that I'm currently having at Haus in Chicago through May 6. It is a body of work that I have been working on for months, and had in my head for the last year or so. It is really excited to have the group of work finished and exhibited together. Click on any of the images to see them larger. I hope you enjoy your visit to the gallery...

This is the front of the gallery with my large bottle forms on display in the window.

Here are some images of the installation of the show.

I have a series of squared platters that I really see as canvases. The surfaces are a combination of layered slips, sprayed glazes and the soda kiln.

I have taken the idea of my surfaces being canvases one step further. I have made a series of wall pieces. These are forms that I have been playing with for a while, but this is the first time that I have exhibited them.

And here are some mugs that echo the grid of squares above...

Chicago artist Amy Lemaire designed floral arrangements in my low oval vases. These are pieces that stand alone as sculptural forms, but come to life with greens, branches and flowers in them. This is just a selection of the pieces. I took these photos on a white piece of paper so you could see them a little bit better.




The show will be up until May 6, 2007 if you'd like to see it in person. There is going to be a "Wine Walk" in the Andersonville neighborhood (where Haus is located) on May 6th. We're going to take this opportunity to have a closing party. If you'd like to participate in the Wine Walk, you can purchase a special wine glass for $20 and you can wander the neighborhood and taste 40 different kinds of wine. For information on this event, visit In Fine Spirit's website.

The previous post is my artist's statement for this show.

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Sunday, April 15, 2007

The future of this blog about ceramics...

I know that I have been a little neglectful of this blog lately. I really enjoy writing and keeping it up to date- but it's been a busy year. When I ask myself : should I make pots today, or write a blog post today? Usually the clay wins out, as it should. Making pots as well as working on a website can be solitary tasks. Sometimes it can feel like no one else is out there.
About a month ago I went to NCECA and got to meet many people in person that I have met through this blog and through my pots. It was a nice reminder that the words and pots are being received on the other end.
I am going to be doing do reorganization of this site so the archives are easier to get to. I also have a lengthy list of topics that I am going to be tackling, and I'd like your input on it.
Some of the topics that I'm going to be writing about:

-a tour of ceramics in Chicago
-pottery/ clay tool reviews
-guest bloggers
-online pottery videos

If you have anything that you'd like me to blog about, just shoot me an email. Or if you come across a link that you think would be interesting to me, let me know.

I look forward to hearing from you!

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Wednesday, April 27, 2005

Studio Sale - May 7th, 2005


As you can see from my postcard image above, I'm having a studio sale at my studio (an innovative idea...) in Chicago on May 7th from 10am - 5pm. To learn more about this sale and to get important information like directions to the studio and payment options, please head on over to sodafired.com and you'll see all the pertinent information you need right there. I hope you can make it.

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Monday, April 11, 2005

Sodafired.com Update

As you probably know, I have these two websites- the one that you're reading, potteryblog.com, and my main one for my ceramic pots, sodafired.com. My hope is that visitors of both go back and forth between the two without necessarily realizing that they have technically gone to a different site. They each serve their own purpose, but those purposes overlap one another.

I just started a sort of "mini-blog" on sodafired.com. I will use it as a way to share studio announcements and that sort of information. It's little news box on the front page of my site.

Tonight the first entry is posted. Just go *here* to read it. I will update it several times a month- or as often as necessary. In the almost 6 years that I have maintained a website of my pottery, I have tried to figure out a good way to fulfill these objectives:
1. Notify people of sales, shows and new work.
2. Make it obvious that the website is really up-to-date and, in general, make it obvious that the site is paid attention to.
3. Showcase some of my new pieces without having some really obnoxious flashing "NEW" sign.
4. Give people a reason to come back to visit the site, and hopefully to come visit me in my studio.
5. And very important: something that is easy for me to update. If it's not, then it won't be very up-to-date! Lots of good intentions, but not enough time.

I think that this format fulfill the above objectives. Hope you enjoy it.
Thanks for reading.

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Saturday, March 26, 2005

500 Cups, Lark Books


500 Cups, cover, Lark Books

This February, Lark Books has released it's newest book is the "500" series. I am lucky enough to have two images in it.

page 110


page 351

My Lillstreet soda firing partner in crime, Gary Jackson,
also has an image in the book.

page 265

This series of books from Lark is beautifully done.
Inspirational for the potter and visually gratifying for the collector.
I also enjoy (and own) other book's from this series:


If you'd like to purchase the book
directly through Amazon...

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Friday, March 25, 2005

Mailing List

I've set up a mailing list so you can be notified anytime I make a posting to this blog. To subscribe to this mailing list, enter your email address and name in the form below.

Please make sure when you're subscription type that you choose: Email - send each message as it arrives.
If you do not choose this, all images and links will be stripped.

Thanks for reading and subscribing!
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Thursday, February 24, 2005

Artist Statement

I recently wrote a new Artist Statement...
______________________________


I grew up in a small town in New Hampshire, surrounded by handmade things. Every Christmas my mom would go to the fabric store and buy all the different color corduroy that they had in stock to sew pants for us. The quilts on our beds and the curtains on the windows were made by her as well. Although my sister and I played with Barbies, the clothes were purchased at craft fairs, and my dad made beds for them that my mom finished off with hand sewn mattresses, pillows and quilts. My father is a painter. I’ve always been surrounded by his work, and observed him while he was inspired by the natural beauty of the New England landscape.

Things in our family were often handmade out of necessity. My mom baked all of our bread, in part, because it was less expensive. But it was also because she loved the process of making it. Growing up in an environment where so many things were made by hand that could have been more easily purchased, I learned to consider and appreciate the story behind a piece. The value comes from the care and thoughtfulness put in by the maker.

Coming from New Hampshire, it’s easy to recognize the beauty of the environment. Six years ago I moved to Chicago, where the beauty of the environment is not as apparent. Beauty is still there, but it’s in the more intimate aspects of life, not in majestic landscapes. I discovered that my inspiration came from the things that I encountered everyday; no longer a forest or a mountain, but those moments amid the busyness of the city where people slow down and appreciate their surroundings. I am honored when my pots can be a part of those moments in people’s lives. Perhaps they will become as familiar to you as the patterns of the cracks in the ceiling above your bed.

Making pots is quiet and personal, an experience I want to be reflected in the pots themselves. But I also am a potter in a community of potters, working alongside both students and peers. Being a potter in a community, it is now hard to imagine myself as a solitary potter. Everyday I share resources, experience, and perspective with my fellow artists. As part of a large community I’ve been given many opportunities to teach students with diverse talents and backgrounds. Teaching has let me experiment with new ideas and perspectives, challenging myself at the same time as I challenge my students.

Being a potter is a very balanced profession. As a potter I am a designer, a maker, a business owner, a laborer a chemist, and a physicist. I love throwing, trimming, pulling handles, firing, I love to decorate, to sketch out ideas in the clay. I am lucky that given all the aspects of my profession, I love and enjoy them each, and I love the product of my craft and its place in the world and in people’s lives.

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Tuesday, November 30, 2004

Studio Sale







This Friday December 3, from 5pm - 10pm is the opening night gala at my studio, Lillstreet Gallery, and all 26 artist studios at Lillstreet Studios in Chicago. We're located at 4401 N. Ravenswood Ave., in Chicago, IL. Come on up to my studio on the second floor (205 west).

My studio will be open during regular business hours throughout the first 3 weeks of December. Feel free to call or email ahead to make an appointment. Or just stop by... I'll be there.

I have lots of new work, like...

and...


and of course you can always find...

I will be taking credit cards, as well as checks and cash. Gift boxes are available.

If you can't make it to my studio, you can find work for sale on my website.
Or you can also find my work this season at:
Hope to see you soon...keep warm!

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